Ask The Doc! Developing Amyloidosis And Antiphospholipid Syndrome

Community
ask the doc

This morning, The doctors discuss a question regarding Developing Amyloidosis after two Stem cell treatments. What can Amyloidosis affect and what is the treatment? They also touch on Antiphospholipid Syndrome. What is it? What causes it? How is it treated? Dr. Whaley also discusses the latest in Covid-19 news! All This and more on Ask The Doc!

 

Ask The Doc! Pancreatic Neoplasm & Anorectal Abscesses

Community
ask the doc, Surface time

This morning, The doctors discuss Dr. Tidman’s Trip to the British Virgin Islands. What hoops did he have to jump through in order to make it there and back. They also discuss Neoplasm Pancreatic Cancer. How does it develop? Why is it so hard to diagnose Pancreatic Cancer? They also discuss Anorectal Abscesses. Where do they come from? How would the Doctors treat them? They also give us a brief Covid-19 update.

 

Ask The Doc: Blood Clotting Gene And Recurring Cancer After 4 Years

Community
ask the doc

This week, Dr. Whaley discusses a blood clotting gene that can be passed down from parents. How likely are you to get it if one of your parents have the gene. What increases the likelyhood of getting a blood clot? He also discusses Prostate cancer recurring after 4 years. What is Oligo-metastatic prostate cancer and how is it treated? Dr. Whaley also gives his weekly covid update. All this and more on Ask The Doc!

 

Ask The Doc! Hemochromatosis & Lung Masses

Community
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This week, Dr. Whaley discusses Hemochromatosis in a healthy patient that had unknowingly been treating it for 30 years. How does he go about treatment now? He also discusses a patient with a broken shoulder that was scanned when a lung mass too small to biopsy showed up on the scan. What’s the latest on Covid?

 

Ask The Doc! Endometrial Carcinoma And Breast Cancer In The Elderly

Lifestyle
ask the doc, virus, information

This week, the doctors are answering all of your health questions! Why is it important to keep up with your annual doctors appointments. What is Endometrial Carcinoma? How common is it? What are the outcomes? What are the different methods of treatment? How do you treat breast cancer in different age groups? What impact does age have on the type of treatment of Breast cancer? They also touch on the recent covid news and some Viewer questions regarding Covid-19.

 

Ask The Doc! A Year Later

Community
ask the doc

This week, the doctors discuss the pandemic and where we were at just a year ago. They discuss the uncertainty and the lack of knowledge we had just a year ago. How much has changed is just a year. They also discuss the viewer questions regarding Large Granular Lymphocyte Leukemia and the “Maintenance” after having a bone marrow transplant. Where do we stand with outdoor events? All this and more right here on Ask The Doc!

 

Ask The Doc! Breast Implant Lymphoma and Throat Cancer

Lifestyle
ask the doc

This morning, the doctors discuss Breast Implant Lymphoma. How common is it? Did the Surgeon make a mistake? The Doctors also touch on Throat Cancer of the Epiglottis. Is the treatment plan correct? The doctors also discuss Covid-19 and the vaccine. What’s True And What’s False? Which of the Vaccines is the most effective?

 

Ask The Doc! Types Of Breast Cancer And The Flu Season

Community
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This week, the doctors discuss the different types of breast cancer. They also touch on a question from a viewer regarding the treatment of their husband’s heart tumors. Is he getting the right treatment? What happened to Flu Season? What’s the latest on Covid-19? All this and more on Ask The Doc!

 

Ask The Doc: Long Term Effects of Surviving Cancer

Just For Fun, Lifestyle
ask the doc, Surface time

This week, Dr. Whaley and Dr. Raymond Tidman discuss some questions sent in by viewers. They touch on the long term effects of Cancer and some possible complications of surviving cancer. They also discuss how to know when you’re cured of cancer. Is there anyway to prevent future complications for cancer survivors? The doctors also discuss the current numbers of cancer survivors compared to in the past.

 

Ask The Doc! Gastric Bypass Complications And Sarcomas

Lifestyle
ask the doc

This morning, the Doctors discuss Gastric Bypass Surgery and its complications. When is this surgery needed? What are its complications? They also answer a question regarding a Sarcoma. Dr. Whaley discusses why you shouldn’t google medical information. They also discuss the latest vaccine news. Who should be receiving the vaccine?

 

Ask The Doc! College And Covid-19

Lifestyle
Ask The Doc! Recovery Process Of Covid-19

This morning, the doctors discuss how colleges are dealing with Covid-19. When a Student tests positive, the colleges continue classes and give the infected student their own quarantined dorm. Is this the approach we should be taking with everything? Should we worry over the numbers? Hear Doctor Whaley and Doctor Tidman’s point of view on this right here on Ask the Doc!

 

Ask The Doc! Recovery Process Of Covid-19

Lifestyle
Ask The Doc! Recovery Process Of Covid-19
This week, on ask the doc, The doctors discuss the recovery process of Covid-19 and how long some symptoms will last even after you’ve recovered. They also touch on the Numbers of hospitalizations and deaths trending down. What do the doctors think football teams should do if a player were to contract Covid-19? When will the vaccine come out to the public? All this and more on Ask The Doc!

Volunteer for COVID-19 Response

Featured, Health

Volunteer for COVID-19 Response

Atlanta – The Georgia Department of Public Health (DPH) is receiving offers from medical
professionals and other individuals looking for ways to help with the COVID-19 response. An
effective response relies on volunteers who are pre-credentialed and organized. Georgia
Responds is Georgia’s health and medical volunteer program which matches the skills and
credentials of medical and nonmedical volunteers to help stop the spread of COVID-19 in
Georgia.

Medical volunteers may be used to answer medical questions coming into the COVID-19
hotline, or assist at test specimen collection sites. Nonmedical volunteers may be used in
administrative roles at either the call-center or test collection sites, or provide interpretation or
other skills as needed.

To volunteer, log on to https://dph.georgia.gov/georgia-responds and click on the “Register
Now” box. Registering only takes a few minutes. Prospective volunteers will be asked for their
name, address, contact information and occupation type. In order to be eligible for some
assignments, responders are encouraged to complete a profile summary, which includes skills
and certifications, training, medical history, emergency contact and deployment preferences
Once your skills and credentials are reviewed, you will be notified by a DPH representative.
All Georgians play a critical role in helping to slow the spread of COVID-19 by adhering
to the following guidance:

• Practice social distancing by putting at least 6 feet between yourself and other people.
• Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
• Stay home if you are sick.
• Wash your hands frequently and thoroughly with soap and water.
• Use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer if soap and water are not available.
• Cover your cough or sneeze with a tissue, then throw the tissue in the trash.
• Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.

For updates on the COVID-19 situation as it develops, follow @GaDPH, @GeorgiaEMA, and
@GovKemp on Twitter and @GaDPH, @GEMA.OHS, and @GovKemp on Facebook.
For information about COVID-19, visit https://dph.georgia.gov/novelcoronavirus or
https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/index.html.

Ask the Doc! Hogkins Lymphoma and Compression Fractures

Featured Stories
ask the doc

Dr. Wiiliam Whaley talks about Hogkins Lymphoma with the cancer research in finding causes and Compression Fractures in people today.

Ask the Doc! Chemo Recovery and the Flu shot Conspiracy

FYNTV, Health
ask the doc

Ask the Doc returns as Dr. William Whaley discusses with Guest host Rick about Chemo treatment recovery and the flu shot conspiracies.

Protect Your Family’s Future by Getting Vaccinated this August

Health

Protect Your Family’s Future by Getting Vaccinated this August

Georgia Department of Public Health Urges Georgia Residents to Protect Themselves by Getting Immunized during National Immunization Awareness Month

 

NORTH GEORGIA – It’s time to really think about vaccinations.

“August is National Immunization Awareness Month, and it’s when we particularly urge parents to make an appointment to get themselves and their families vaccinated.” said Ashley Deverell, RN, BSN, Immunization Coordinator for the North Georgia Health District, based in Dalton. “Vaccinations are our best defense against vaccine-preventable diseases and are available at all our health departments in Cherokee, Fannin, Gilmer, Murray, Pickens and Whitfield counties.”

People of all ages require timely vaccinations to protect their health, and in August, public health advisors especially focus on vaccinations needed for pregnant women, babies and young children, preteens and teens, adults, and children entering or heading back to school.

Every adult in Georgia (19 years of age and older) should follow the recommended immunization schedule by age and medical condition. Vaccinations protect you and they protect others around you, especially infants and those individuals who are unable to be immunized or who have weakened immune systems. It is always a good idea to have the adult vaccine schedule nearby as a reference and to make sure you are current on your immunizations. This link is to the recommended adult immunization schedule:

http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/schedules/downloads/adult/adult-schedule-easy-read.pdf.

Vaccines protect families, teens and children by preventing disease. They help avoid expensive therapies and hospitalization needed to treat infectious diseases like influenza and pneumococcal disease. Vaccinations also reduce absences both at school and at work and decrease the spread of illness in the home, workplace and community.

Before starting seventh grade, all students born on or after January 1, 2002 and entering or transferring into seventh grade will need proof of a whooping cough booster shot and a meningococcal shot unless the child has an exemption on file with the school.

And, looking ahead for the 2020-2021 school year, all students entering or transferring into 11th grade will need proof of a meningococcal booster shot (MCV4), unless their first dose was received on or after their 16th birthday. Meningococcal disease is a serious bacterial illness that affects the brain and the spinal cord. Meningitis can cause shock, coma and death within hours of the first symptoms. To help protect your children and others from meningitis, Georgia law requires students be vaccinated against this disease, unless the child has an exemption.

Some schools, colleges, and universities have policies requiring vaccination against meningococcal disease as a condition of enrollment. Students aged 21 years or younger should have documentation of receipt of a dose of meningococcal conjugate vaccine not more than five years before enrollment. If the primary dose was administered before their 16th birthday, a booster dose should be administered before enrollment in college.

“The focus of vaccinations often lies on young children, but it’s just as important for teens, college students and adults to stay current on their vaccinations.” said Shelia Lovett, Director of the Immunization Program of the Georgia Department of Public Health.

This August, protect your family by getting vaccinated. The North Georgia Health District remind adults to check with their local county health department or healthcare provider for their current vaccination recommendations, and parents are urged to check for their children. Safe and effective vaccines are available to protect adults and children alike against potentially life-threatening diseases such as tetanus, diphtheria, pertussis, meningococcal disease, hepatitis A, hepatitis B, shingles, measles, mumps, rubella and varicella (chickenpox). So, visit your public health department or talk to your health care provider and get immunized today.

For more information on immunization, visit http://dph.georgia.gov/immunization-section.

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